Le Blog de Langrensha et Langrensha

J+19



Mon quotidien
Battery for Asus G74

Les Présentations
Battery for Dell 7FJ92
Battery for Acer TravelMate 6592G
Akku für Acer Aspire 4S820TG

Mes rendez-vous
Battery for ASUS G75
Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T
Battery for SONY VGP-BPS21
Battery for Apple A1495
Battery for Samsung NP-R460
Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T
Batterie pour Compaq Presario CQ40
Battery for DELL Alienware M17x

Les échographies
Batterie pour Samsung AA-PB2VC6W
Akku für Samsung AA-PL9NC6B
Battery for Samsung NP-R520
Battery for HP Compaq 6515b
Akku Dell Latitude D430 kaufen-akku.com

Les achats
Battery for Toshiba Satellite L650
Akku für Dell Alienware M14x R2
Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T
Batterie pour Compaq Presario CQ72
Akku Dell Latitude D830

Divers
Battery for Dell Inspiron 1525
Batterie pour FPCBP281
Batterie pour Sony VGP-BPS13
Akku für ASUS A32-K55
Battery for lenovo IdeaPad Z575
Akku für IBM ThinkPad T60
Batterie pour Toshiba PA3817U-1BRS
Batterie HP COMPAQ NX9040
Akku für Dell Inspiron N7010


Battery for Dell 7FJ92

Unlike their main competitors – SmartThings, owned by Samsung, and Wink – WigWag plans to use the power of open source software and the broader technical community to create the solution that more and more people are asking for: a way to make the disparate world of smart-home products function together.Open source is ultimately more flexible, Hemphill notes, and since it's completely exposed, it is far more likely that bugs will be found.Like so many other IoT companies, WigWag has its own smart lightbulb and room sensor – covering everything from motion and noise to temperature and humidity – but its real focus is on its gateway hub. Its goal is both simple and complex: create a way for people to easily control multiple different products.To do so, it has several different components in its $149 relay that work with the main IoT standards: one covering Z-Wave; one covering ZigBee; another that will work with Bluetooth LTE. It is working on full support for Google's Thread protocol and will add Wi-Fi later this year. In short, anything that is out there, it will try to work with.Most critically however, the whole thing is built using Javascript, Go code and C/C++ and, Hemphill stresses, everything will be open sourced. When a new product comes out, a simple .js file – created by WigWag or, the company hopes, by a community of coders – will be added to the system, then downloaded and updated.


It is a system that is desperately needed. The IoT market is so diverse, with every product seemingly requiring its own app (and sometimes its own hub), that it has actually started to hold the market back. What's worse is that consumers' number one concern – security – suffers. Most products use and store your home Wi-Fi as a way of communicating, but sloppy security has repeatedly made those authentication details accessible, opening up your entire home's system to attack.Hemphill sees the problem as an opportunity. The assumption has always been that everything outbound is fine, and you just need to protect from stuff coming in, he notes, but that's just not the case any more.Until very recently, everything on your network was pretty simple – a laptop, a PC, a mobile phone – but now with people adding new products, many of which are running software that could be years out of date, the problem could be inside the network.People are adding weird stuff now, he notes. That new product you buy might be running Linux 2.8 [we're on 4.8]. The SDK could be five years old.Hemphill is all too aware of this problem: in the US Signal Corps, by the time technology worked its way down to the troops – through the bureaucracy and multitude of defense companies that all wanted to take their cut – it was already out of date. It's a long time ago, but I can remember Windows XP coming out and being given new gear running NT4. That's 2001 and 1996 to save you wracking your brains.



Not that WigWag's product has the solution to the problem. At least not yet. The company is working on a firewall within its product that will give you greater control over what your smart-home products actually do.Hemphill gives two examples. If you have a Belkin product, for example, you want to make sure it is only communicating with Belkin's cloud service. Anything else and something unusual may be happening.Equally, if you have, say, a webcam in your bedroom. You don't want it to be on all the time – particularly when you are in the room at night. But as things currently stand, the company you bought the camera from has a surprising degree of control over that. No one is going to physically turn off a camera every night, but a gateway could electronically shut it off on a time schedule you decide upon. You want to be able to turn if off, and say 'I own the LAN', he argues, and that includes it not talking to the mothership.By being open source, not only do the security problems get smaller – because of all the eyeballs on it – but the ability to work with new products grows. What's more, the approach can keep old products alive. When Nest/Google killed the Revolv hub, people rightly freaked out. What is less known is the decision by TCP to end support for its lightbulb hub. Hemphill says that WigWag has effectively brought that hub back to life by allowing the bulbs to continue to communicate.


The beauty of open source also means that the code can be included wherever it needs to be: in the product, in the cloud, in your router. The idea is to provide a solution that enables different products to function together, while also providing a degree of essential security.So where does WigWag make its money? It has patents on the next level up – syncing – and, it hopes, a leg-up in the world of properly functioning hubs. It is putting its money on the fact that when it comes to complexity, open is the way to go. Open has always, always worked better, says Hemphill. Meh. Another day, another proposition. Disappointingly, this time it’s my laptop offering to do the business, right there in my lap.Ever since I updated its operating system to Sierra, it’s been running hot and cold. Actually no, I mean hot and hotter, regularly firing up the fans in an attempt to cool itself down.For my laptop is a MacBook Pro – or given that the operating system has been pointlessly rebranded from “Mac OS” to “macOS”, it is probably now called a macBOOK prO. From apPLE.Luckily for them, this overheating issue has been entirely ignored by the general public because it barely reaches lukewarm proportions compared with the quite literally explosive problems over at Apple’s playground enemy, Samsung.



It’s not for me to trawl up old news about the fire-starting, twisted fire-starting Galaxy Note 7 since it’s been repeated to death in the mainstream media channels already. Let me simply express my manga-reader’s tingle of recognition when some people started calling the product the Death Note.In fact, I think I managed to source a photo of the event at which Samsung announced the immediate recall of all units:Back to the Cupertino dickswingers, though: for the benefit of those of you who don’t care what the fanboi favourite does, I am happy to confirm that your gut feeling is well-founded. macOS Sierra is an upgrade that puts Siri on proper computers, hauling it up from its previous hopeless depths of uselessness to somewhere almost half as good as Cortana.And Cortana, as you must already be aware, is about as indispensable in the burgeoning personal AI field as the unwanted cork placemat you were given by an aunt some 15 Christmases ago and are now using to stop your (actually useful) Amazon Echo from scratching the surface of your coffee table.I don’t use Siri because it’s an idiot that can’t understand plain English spoken by an Englishman living in England. Unless, of course, the problem is that I am only half English: perhaps it’s the Scottish half that’s buggering up Siri’s comprehension of wha’ um sayun'.


Message déposé le 20.06.2017 à 07:22 - Commentaires (0)


Battery for Acer TravelMate 6592G

He writes that the phone had the things he wanted most, and while browsing doesn't need a keyboard, writing book chapters and blog posts is painful on a phone screen – hence the painstaking effort to hack the laptop into a keyboard for the phone.“I use the phone for multiple interfaces, yes VNC, but more often using my laptop’s keyboard to interface to the phone’s existing apps, Termux (to SSH into my laptop), Chrome, Gmail, Whatsapp, etc.”Sorry to say, part A is always going to be painful – actually starting the laptop blind – and with a tiny screen area working he could remember how to get to the Linux desktop and a terminal screen.“By a huge stroke of luck I had the extra good fortune to have two text lines worth of working pixels at the top of the screen. Well I say working, they didn’t automatically update, I had to sort of twist the screen with my hands and at some point they’d decide to update.”
To present the laptop's login interface via the phone, he had to install an OpenSSH client (also a blind install), and here's an important lesson for everyone: “always setup an SSH daemon with a strong password on a new laptop”.


For “normal” operations, though, Buckley-Houston wanted to get the laptop's keyboard working as a Bluetooth keyboard to the phone.By now, though, he's got a screen – so it was just a matter of testing various packages to see which worked best, and settling on one called Hidclient.The Register won't be trying this ourselves any time soon, but we're sure some of our readers will want to top this experience. We're always listening. Security startup MedSec and the financial house backing the biz have published new allegations of security flaws in pacemakers and defibrillators built by St Jude Medical – and again look set to profit from the disclosures in an unorthodox way.In four swish videos, the MedSec team claims it exploited a debugging backdoor in the St Jude-built Merlin@home control unit so it could send commands wirelessly to a patient's defibrillator. The team were able to hijack the the control unit after reverse-engineering its software, written in Java, and hooking a laptop to the unit via Ethernet.MedSec claims it could do away with the Merlin@home all together, and wirelessly send orders to people's devices in their chests from software-defined radio kit, after working out St Jude's protocols.Using the compromised terminal, the team says it managed to make the defibrillator vibrate constantly, turn off its heart monitoring software, or get it to administer a mild electric shock, which the actor narrating the video describes as "painful, and can be detrimental to a patient's health if used in an unprescribed manner."MedSec's CEO Justine Bone explained to The Register that the team had used a hacked MedSec device because it was the easiest route to show deficiencies in the device. By using old debugged developer code left on the device by the original designers, they were able to take control of it.


"We believe that this could be done from any wireless attack platform once someone had written out all protocols," she said. "It's going to be very hard to fix; you'd have to rewrite the RF communication protocols."Some of the attacks, particularly if used in conjunction with each other, could put lives at risk. But she acknowledged that in tests so far the maximum range of the defibrillator was limited to seven feet, so an attacker would have to be up close and personal.Bone also said that the MedSec team hadn't contacted St Jude Medical about the flaws before releasing the videos, and had instead gone to the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Homeland Security. Bone said this was because St Jude doesn't have a good record of sorting out flaws like this.St Jude confirmed to The Register that MedSec hadn't passed on any details about the flaws, and made the following statement:



"Muddy Waters and MedSec have once again made public unverified videos that purport to raise safety issues about the cybersecurity of St Jude Medical devices. This behavior continues to circumvent all forms of responsible disclosure related to cybersecurity and patient safety and continues to demonstrate total disregard for patients, physicians and the regulatory agencies who govern this industry."The company is also setting up a Cybersecurity Medical Advisory Board to give it tips on how to build more secure products. However, it appears as though it's mostly staffed by doctors, who aren't the best for finding sloppy software holes.The whole sorry saga started in August when MedSec found what it claims were flaws in St Jude's devices. Rather than go to the manufacturer and sort these out, the firm partnered with financial house Muddy Waters and shorted the stock before going public with the news.The security firm now gets a payout based on how far St Jude's stock price falls – the more the better. St Jude and others have disputed the claims, and St Jude is now suing those involved in the disclosures. People who have St Jude devices implanted have been left panicked and confused by the whole matter.


In the meantime, many in the security community are worried that this kind of disclosure is just going to increase fear, uncertainty, and doubt in an industry sector already bedeviled with it. If short selling becomes the norm, then headlines rather than fixes will become the goal, and it's difficult to see how that benefits end users. HP Inc has disclosed pricing for HP Workspace, the Windows app-streaming service that allows its new Elite x3 business phone to fully replace a PC.Although Universal apps on Windows 10 mobile apps can adapt to run fullscreen with a keyboard and mouse, Workspace is needed to run legacy Win32 apps, which don’t run natively on ARM devices such as the x3. Workspace streams the apps to the Elite x3 at 15fps, sufficient for most business applications.The per-user monthly pricing is $79 and $40, depending on how much Win32 you need. Both packages give you a dedicated two-core vCPU. $79 buys you 8GB of virtual machine RAM and 80 hours per month, and unlimited apps. The more basic “Essential" tier aimed at “mostly mobile” workers buys you a 4GB RAM virtual machine and 40 hours of app streaming a month, limited to up to 10 apps.This isn’t cheap, but as Windows watcher Steve Litchfield points out, it’s cheaper than paying an in-house IT team to sit around all day, setting fire to the bins.And you can blame Microsoft for the pricing. VDI (virtual desktop infrastructure) as a service can be found cheaper via AWS, but Microsoft still sets a floor price.


Message déposé le 17.06.2017 à 10:14 - Commentaires (0)


Akku für Acer Aspire 4S820TG

Die GTÜ hatte in sechs Kategorien getestet, darunter Bedienung, Funktionsumfang und Preis. Am meisten Gewicht hatte die Kategorie "Elektrische Prüfungen", in der etwa die Funkenbildung und der Verpolungsschutz geprüft wurden. Positiv: Keines der getesteten Geräte hatte hier größere Probleme.Zwei Lader wiesen erhebliche Schwächen in anderen Bereichen auf und waren deshalb nur "bedingt empfehlenswert". Eines der Geräte fiel in der Kältekammer negativ auf, als dort die Kabel-Zugentlastung brach. Das andere war nicht für den Gebrauch im Freien ausgelegt.Am anderen Ende der Skala stand der Testsieger CTEK MXS 5.0, der unter anderem mit einer Regenerationsfunktion überzeugte. Die kann laut GTÜ durch Säureschichtung schwächelnden Nassbatterien mitunter wieder mehr Kapazität und bessere Startfähigkeit geben. An zweiter Stelle folgte der GYS Flash 4, den dritten Rang belegte der Banner Accu Charger 12V/3A.


Aus allen Richtungen waren sie eingeflogen, aus Europa, Nordamerika, Südamerika, Asien, Afrika, vor zwei Wochen, weil ja in Australien und Neuseeland die ersten Turniere der neuen Tennissaison stattfanden. Alles steuerte auf den Höhepunkt zu, der nun mit der Leistungsmesse in Melbourne an diesem Montag beginnt. Bei der Verteilung von Ruhm und inzwischen 27,9 Millionen Euro gilt es dabei zu sein. "The Grand Slam of Asia-Pacific", so werben die Australian Open für sich. Der Titel bringt das Alleinstellungsmerkmal auf den Punkt: So abgelegen ist keines der vier wichtigsten Turniere der Welt, zu denen noch Paris, Wimbledon und New York zählen. Aber nicht nur deshalb hebt sich die Veranstaltung ab. Hier folgen zehn Gründe, warum die Australian Open für etwas Außergewöhnliches stehen.Roger Federer fing der Legende nach damit an, die Australian Open nicht Grand Slam, sondern Happy Slam zu nennen. Weil in Melbourne so viele Menschen gute Laune haben und eben glücklich sind. Zumindest wirkt es so in dem Land, in dem einem ständig ein "No worries" um die Ohren fliegt - alles paletti, mach dir keine Sorgen, passt alles, kein Stress. Eine Wohltat ist diese Lebenseinstellung, die abstrahlt auf Spielerinnen und Spieler. Tatsächlich findet man hier unfreundliche oder gar schlecht gelaunte Bürger so häufig wie Schnee in der Sahara. Für die Profis könnte die Saison demnach nicht besser beginnen als mit Matches in der Sonne und angenehm entspannten Menschen, die Sport grundsätzlich lieben. Sogar rüstige Omis verfolgen Partien, löffeln währenddessen mitgebrachten Reissalat und beklatschen zwischendurch Spieler, von denen sie noch nie etwas gehört haben und nie mehr hören werden.



Berlin (dpa/tmn) - Verbrauchern ist TP-Link als Hersteller von Routern und anderen Netzwerk-Geräten ein Begriff. Nun steigt das chinesische Unternehmen in den Smartphone-Markt ein: Neffos heißen die ersten drei Handys von TP-Link.In Deutschland soll ab März zunächst das Einsteigermodell Neffos C5L mit 4,5-Zoll-Display (854 mal 480 Pixel) und Vierkern-CPU Snapdragon 210 für 100 Euro zu haben sein. Zur Ausstattung gehören neben LTE und 1 Gigabyte (GB) RAM eine Acht-Megapixel-Kamera, 8 GB Speicher, der sich per SD-Karte auf bis zu 32 GB erweitern lässt, sowie ein 2000 Milliamperestunden starker Akku. Als Betriebssystem läuft auf dem zentimeterdicken und 154 Gramm schweren Dual-SIM-Smartphone Android 5.1 (Lollipop).München (dpa/tmn) – Vom Auto kennt man das Problem: Fällt das Thermometer deutlich unter null, macht die Batterie schlapp. Und nicht nur Autos leiden unter der Kälte, auch das Smartphone in der Tasche, das Notebook im Rucksack oder die Kamera sind ziemliche Frostbeulen.


Wirklich leiden tun die meisten Geräte zwar erst bei hohen Minusgraden, Betriebsfehler treten aber schon bei leichtem Frost auf. Besonders ärgerlich ist das bei Geräten, die auch unterwegs und auf der Skipiste funktionieren sollen.Als Erstes wirkt sich die Kälte auf die Stromversorgung aus. Die Leistung von Smartphone- oder Kamera-Akku lässt mit der Zeit nach, wenn das Gerät zu kalt wird. Der Akku wird schneller leer und braucht länger zum Aufladen. Also: Geräte am besten bei Zimmertemperatur an die Steckdose. Auffälligen Leistungsabfall gibt es vor allem bei hohen Minusgraden: "Minus zehn Grad sind die kritische Grenze, ab da geht es rapide bergab", erklärt Heidi Atzler vom Tüv Süd.Das Energieproblem betrifft nicht nur Smartphone-Akkus. Auch Powerbanks - also Batterien zum mobilen Laden - machen bei Kälte schneller schlapp, erklärt Johannes Weicksel vom IT-Verband Bitkom. Auch Prozessoren in Smartphone, Tablet oder Laptop werden langsamer, wenn sie längerer Zeit großer Kälte ausgesetzt sind. Deswegen sollte man diese Geräte im Winter zum Beispiel nicht über Nacht im Auto liegen lassen – erst recht nicht, wenn die Temperaturen unter den Gefrierpunkt fallen. Denn innerhalb des Fahrzeugs wird es nachts fast genauso kalt wie draußen.


Neben dem Akku ist vor allem das Display kälteanfällig. "LCD-Displays reagieren bei Kälte träge, so dass der Touch-Screen weniger bis gar nicht funktioniert", sagt Michael Eck vom Tüv Nord. Grund dafür ist, dass die Flüssigkristalle innerhalb des Displays gewissermaßen einfrieren. Dadurch reagiert die Oberfläche deutlich langsamer als gewohnt auf Berührungen. Farbdarstellung und Beleuchtung können ebenfalls schlechter werden. Normalerweise verschwinden die Fehler, wenn das Gerät wieder aufgewärmt ist, manche Defekte bleiben aber dauerhaft.Bei strengem Frost ist es deshalb sinnvoll, auch tragbare Navigationsgeräte aus dem Auto über Nacht mit in die Wohnung zu nehmen. Besitzer eingebauter Navis können beruhigt sein: "Im Auto eingebaute Displays sollten auch bei extremer Kälte zuverlässig reagieren, denn hier gelten deutlich schärfere Betriebstemperaturen", erklärt Eck.Fast noch gefährlicher als tiefe Temperaturen sind große Temperaturschwankungen. "Abrupte Temperaturwechsel sind ein großes Risiko bei Handys", warnt Wiebke Hellman von der Fachzeitschrift "Chip". Wer etwa nach einem Nachmittag auf der Piste in die geheizte Skihütte zurückkehrt, riskiert den Gerätekollaps. "Kondenswasser bildet sich auf kalten Oberflächen in warmer Umgebung", erklärt Michael Eck. Diese Feuchtigkeit kann zu Kurzschlüssen oder Korrosion an Kontakten oder auf der Platine führen.Um auf Nummer sicher zu gehen, sollte man das Gerät erst aufwärmen lassen, bevor man es nutzt. "Je nach Größe des Geräts kann das bis zu zwei Stunden dauern", sagt Eck. Um dem Auskühlen vorzubeugen, tragen Nutzer ihre Geräte am besten nah am Körper, zum Beispiel in der Hosen- oder Jackentasche. Smartphones haben auch einen gewissen Eigenschutz: "Handys werden bei der Arbeit warm", erklärt Heidi Atzler. Akku und Display kühlen deshalb nicht ganz so schnell aus. Um das empfindliche Gerät nicht unnötig Kälte und Schnee auszusetzen, kann man ein Headset benutzen: "Damit kann man telefonieren oder das Smartphone per Sprachsteuerung bedienen, ohne es dafür in die Hand zu nehmen", sagt Johannes Weicksel. Handyhüllen bieten dagegen wenig Kälteschutz: "Sie helfen gegen Stöße und Schläge, wärmen aber kaum", sagt Wiebke Hellmann. Dafür schirmen wasserdichte Materialien wie Neopren das Handy gegen Schneegestöber oder Nieselregen ab.



Und wenn das Gerät doch einmal schlappmacht oder zu viel Feuchtigkeit abgekommen hat? "Feucht gewordene Geräte kann man vorsichtig mit dem lauwarmen oder kalten Fön trocknen", rät Eck. Bei Geräten wie Kameras, die aufgrund ihres Einsatzbereiches ungeschützt dem Frost ausgesetzt sind, hilft ein Ersatzakku. Wem der Saft ausgeht, kann dem Akku außerdem durch Reiben zwischen den Händen oft noch ein wenig Restenergie abtrotzen.München (dpa/tmn) – Wer ein neues Smartphone kauft, muss nicht gleich sein Konto überziehen: Abseits der neusten Flaggschiffe von Apple, Samsung, HTC, Sony und Co. bietet der Handymarkt eine Menge Sparpotential. Frei nach dem Motto: Wenig Geld für viel Smartphone, und zwar im Tiefpreis- und im Premium-Segment.An der Frage, wie viel ein neues Smartphone mindestens kosten sollte, scheiden sich die Geister. Experten nennen hier eine Preisspanne von 120 bis 200 Euro als Startpreis. Von den Geräten darf man dann keine Wunderdinge erwarten. "Für viele Nutzer reichen sie jedoch aus", sagt Manuel Schreiber vom Fachmagazin "Chip". Wer hin und wieder im Netz surft, seine Mails checkt, SMS und Messenger nutzt, telefoniert oder ein grafisch nicht allzu aufwendiges Spiel startet, wird mit so einem Modell zufrieden sein, meint Schreiber.


Message déposé le 16.06.2017 à 08:47 - Commentaires (0)


 Livre d'Or

 Contact



Tous les messages
Battery for ASUS G75
Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T
Battery for Toshiba Satellite L650
Battery for SONY VGP-BPS21
Battery for Apple A1495
Batterie pour Samsung AA-PB2VC6W
Akku für Dell Alienware M14x R2
Battery for Dell 7FJ92
Battery for Samsung NP-R460
Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T
Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T
Batterie pour Compaq Presario CQ72
Akku für Samsung AA-PL9NC6B
Battery for Acer TravelMate 6592G
Battery for Asus G74
Battery for Samsung NP-R520
Batterie pour Compaq Presario CQ40
Akku für Acer Aspire 4S820TG
Battery for DELL Alienware M17x
Battery for HP Compaq 6515b
Battery for Dell Inspiron 1525
Batterie pour FPCBP281
Batterie pour Sony VGP-BPS13
Akku für ASUS A32-K55
Battery for lenovo IdeaPad Z575
Akku für IBM ThinkPad T60
Batterie pour Toshiba PA3817U-1BRS
Batterie HP COMPAQ NX9040
Akku für Dell Inspiron N7010
Akku Dell Latitude D830
Akku Dell Latitude D430 kaufen-akku.com


Créez votre blog sur Blog-grossesse.com