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Mes rendez-vous
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Les échographies
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Les achats
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Divers
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Battery for ASUS G75

On Thursday, the 30-year-old marched into the Apple store located in Toison d'Or shopping Centre in Dijon carrying the steel ball in a gloved hand. He was accompanied by someone videoing the scene, which suggests premeditation.He then proceeded to pick up iPhones, place them flat on the counter, and smash their screens in using the ball.While doing so he rails against the staff, claiming that he had bought a shiny new laptop from them that had failed and he wanted his money back.While this was going on, staff stood around doing nothing and keeping clear. He then moved on to some MacBooks and carried on his smashing activities before a security guard finally turned up and escorted him from the store.
Once outside, more security guards appeared and surrounded the man. After a full and frank exchange of views, the attacker put his hands around the throat of one of the guards and the others piled in to restrain him.The man has since been detained by police and is currently facing criminal charges. Dijon prosecutor Marie-Christine Tarrare said that the man had caused €50,000 worth of damage to the shop's stock.


Getting stiffed on a new purchase is never fun, but the gentleman involved should have taken a lead from we rosbifs and shown some sang froid. A disgraced former Territorial Army sergeant convicted of making indecent images of children has pleaded guilty to using private browsing mode on his iPhone and iPad.Paul Martin McGarrity, a 56-year-old of Mirabel House, Wandsworth Bridge Road, Fulham, appeared at Hammersmith Magistrates’ Court this morning to be sentenced, following his earlier plea at the same court.The former Royal Signals SNCO was ordered “not to use any device capable of accessing the internet unless it has the capacity to retain and display the history of internet use and he makes such device available on request to a police officer”, as part of a sexual offences prevention order (SOPO) made by a court martial at Bulford Camp in 2011.The SOPO was made after McGarrity, who was on full-time attachment to a regular Royal Signals unit, pleaded guilty to two counts of making an indecent photograph of a child. The order also said he "cannot take any photograph of a child under 18 unless authorised, expressed or implied, by a parent or legal guardian."



He pleaded guilty to breaching the SOPO, contrary to sections 103I(1) and (3) of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, in August. Sentencing was then adjourned for pre-sentence reports to be completed.According to the Crown at today's hearing, police were empowered to make spot checks on McGarrity to check his compliance with the SOPO. When they arrived unannounced at his flat on 19 February this year, they found him using a laptop and an iPad. McGarrity agreed to allow the police to inspect the devices “and within a couple of minutes it was noticed” that he was using the iPad in private browsing mode.Police took away the iPad, his iPhone and his laptop. The iPhone was found to also have been used in private browsing mode and the history had been “switched off”, the court heard.Three search capabilities were said to have been present on his devices: Safari, Chrome and DuckDuckGo, the anonymous search engine. DuckDuckGo, a web-based search engine that does not track your internet searches, is available as an iOS app.


Police interviewed McGarrity and it was said that he “didn't understand what was meant by private browsing”. He maintained that he hadn't altered the device settings, though the court heard this morning that he was warned in 2014 about using private browsing.Shaven-headed McGarrity, wearing a plain grey t-shirt with a small Union Flag at the back of the neck and blue Adidas tracksuit bottoms, leaned on the rail of the dock as his solicitor made his plea in mitigation to the judge.His solicitor, from London firm Dalton Holmes Gray – who refused to confirm his name after the hearing – said in McGarrity's defence that he “suffered from clinical depression” and was undergoing cognitive behavioural therapy, as well as receiving employment support allowance."No substantive offending has resulted from the breach," asserted McGarrity's solicitor.District Judge Susan Bayne, sitting alone, adjourned the sentencing hearing to a later date. Indicating that she wanted to make a new sexual harm prevention order against McGarrity, she said the court had insufficient information to do so this morning. A disgraced former Territorial Army sergeant convicted of making indecent images of children has pleaded guilty to using private browsing mode on his iPhone and iPad.Paul Martin McGarrity, a 56-year-old of Mirabel House, Wandsworth Bridge Road, Fulham, appeared at Hammersmith Magistrates’ Court this morning to be sentenced, following his earlier plea at the same court.



The former Royal Signals SNCO was ordered “not to use any device capable of accessing the internet unless it has the capacity to retain and display the history of internet use and he makes such device available on request to a police officer”, as part of a sexual offences prevention order (SOPO) made by a court martial at Bulford Camp in 2011.The SOPO was made after McGarrity, who was on full-time attachment to a regular Royal Signals unit, pleaded guilty to two counts of making an indecent photograph of a child. The order also said he "cannot take any photograph of a child under 18 unless authorised, expressed or implied, by a parent or legal guardian."He pleaded guilty to breaching the SOPO, contrary to sections 103I(1) and (3) of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, in August. Sentencing was then adjourned for pre-sentence reports to be completed.According to the Crown at today's hearing, police were empowered to make spot checks on McGarrity to check his compliance with the SOPO. When they arrived unannounced at his flat on 19 February this year, they found him using a laptop and an iPad. McGarrity agreed to allow the police to inspect the devices “and within a couple of minutes it was noticed” that he was using the iPad in private browsing mode.


Message déposé le 23.06.2017 à 07:39 - Commentaires (0)


Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T

One of customer got in touch to report that BT customers are currently being locked into their BT Yahoo email service.A recent screengrab of a customer attempting to use this function seen by The Register reads: “Sorry the delete feature is currently unavailable. This feature will become available by the end of September."The customer said BT/Yahoo! had also made it impossible for BT customers to configure the forwarding of emails to a third party address from their BT Yahoo addresses.He said: "BT is being about as communicative as Trappist monks about this."He added: "BT refuse to acknowledge any contractual responsibilities to customers with regard to email as they see email as a freebie add-on to the broadband service."Other customers have also complained on BT's forum. One said: "Help! I have tried to delete email sub accounts but unable to do so. Any help and or advice will be greatly appreciated."Another complained: "It's October BTYahoo get it sorted or did you mean September 2020?"Apparently these problems also affect customers who have migrated to the new BTMail email provider Critical Path/Openwave.


A BT spokesman told The Register: “We apologise to customers who have been unable to delete their Yahoo! account. We are working quickly to sort this out and expect to have this fixed soon.” US trade watchdog the FTC has terminated second-hand electronics reseller Laptop & Desktop Repair in Sparks, Nevada – after the biz shafted people out of millions of dollars.The company, operating under such names as cashforiphones.com, cashforlaptops.com, ecyclebest.com, smartphonetraders.com and sell-your-cell.com, offered online quotes for used smartphones and laptops.Once the quote had been calculated, people sent in their hardware for assessment and were given a much lower revised quote – typically between 3 and 10 per cent of the original amount offered.They had three to five days to request that their hardware be returned, but the FTC found that the company seldom answered its phones and was closed on weekends, even though the firm counted Saturdays and Sundays in its time limits."This is a classic case of bait-and-switch updated for the 21st century," said Jessica Rich, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection."The defendants in this case lure consumers with false promises of generous payments, then hold consumers hostage once they have mailed their devices to the company."After an investigation by the FTC and the US state of Georgia, the biz has now been shut down and had its assets seized. The FTC said it had received thousands of complaints about the firm, which kind of makes you wonder what took them so long.



A pair of cybercriminals responsible for laundering millions of pounds stolen using a banking trojan have been sentenced to a combined total of 12 years in prison.Pavel Gincota, 32, and Ion Turcan, 35, are Moldovan nationals with Romanian citizenship. The duo made over £2.5m in criminal profits using the banking trojan Dridex, the National Crime Agency and London's Metropolitan Police Service revealed.The pair were charged with conspiracy to possess false identification and conspiracy to launder money, while Gincota was also charged with a separate money laundering offence in relation to a cyber fraud in Germany in 2012, in which the victim lost €25,000.Gincota and Turcan pleaded guilty to all of the charges against them and were sentenced yesterday at the Old Bailey to five years and eight months and seven years respectively.Over two years the pair “funded a luxury lifestyle” with their ill-gotten gains, garnered from more than 220 bank accounts which they had accessed after infecting their victims' machines.According to Court News UK (behind paywall), the investigation into the pair began in June 2015 "after more than half a million pounds was stolen from a medical research company and laundered through a series of Barclays accounts".


They were reportedly already under investigation by the National Crime Agency when they were arrested by the Met in February 2015 for being in possession of multiple false identity documents. During a search of their home in Yiewsley, West Drayton, the cops seized further fraudulent documents and several electronic devices.Forensic examination of these devices by the NCA's National Cyber Crime Unit (NCCU) confirmed that a laptop belonging to Gincota had been used to control the bank accounts through which the money was laundered.Steve Brown, senior investigating officer at the NCCU, said: “Pavel Gincota and Ion Turcan were serial money launderers who processed millions of pounds worth of stolen money through hundreds of bank accounts to fund their lifestyles.“Those involved in the most serious types of organised crime depend on the services provided by money launderers like Gincota and Turcan to hide their criminal profits."He continued: “The NCA will continue to work closely with our partners to prevent organised criminals from accessing the proceeds of their crimes and to bring them to justice.”


Google today announced new phones, VR kit and home gadgetry. But it didn't announce a tablet. And nobody cared.We've known for ages that tablet sales are declining. The most recent tablet sales data we've covered has the market at about 150m units a year. Apple has a quarter of the market and Samsung has about 15 per cent. Vendors in third through fifth place – Lenovo, Huawei and Amazon – won't sell ten million units a year.The tablet market's sliding even faster than the PC market – by about 12 per cent a year compared to five per cent for PCs.We can also see that it takes more and more effort to get a tablet off the shelf: Apple has teamed with Deloitte to point out how an iPad might make sense at work, having already allied itself with IBM. Microsoft, meanwhile, has bundled training with its Surface-as-a-service pay-by-the-month plan for its hybrid laptop/fondleslab Surface products. Those hybrids, by the way, are considered the sole bright spot in the PC market.



And now Google's act of omission shows us that the company's assault on our personal space does not include a frontline role for a tablet computer.Which is not to say that tablets are doomed. They are clearly very handy devices in many applications. But the lack of a Google tab clearly shows us the fondleslab's not a core component of the evolving connected home. And that their omission won't be mourned. Roundtable On the afternoon of Oct 12, in central London, we’ll be gathering a select group of senior IT leaders together to discuss the changing nature of end user computing.We'll kic off by exploring the digital workplace of the future and the likely shift from devices to users and infrastructure. We’ll touch on the realities of making the shift happen - not just the technology to create a modern and open environment, but also how to manage all the stakeholders and budgets.Fundamentally we'll explore how the increasingly heterogeneous world of multiple operating systems, devices and clouds are changing the way we think about end user computing.It promises to be both a lively and useful discussion. If you'd like to join us, please register your interest here and we'll be in touch to confirm your attendance.A French man has been charged after he stormed into an Apple store and smashed up iPhones and MacBooks using a metal ball that is more commonly used for the traditional game of pétanque.


Message déposé le 23.06.2017 à 07:25 - Commentaires (0)


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The problem was that it had got to the point where he and his team were spending hours listening to stories from users and managers within the business justifying why they, or even their whole department, should be an exception. Some were adamant that the latest Apple MacBook, Microsoft Surface or some other clever convertible was the only thing that would solve their productivity needs.Others said it was essential to have an iPad with all the accessories, which would meet all of their requirements - though of course they would have to hang onto their Windows laptop “just in case”.Add to this the usual sob stories about how 18-month-old laptops really had to be replaced because they didn’t support the latest Wi-Fi standard, only had 4GB of memory, had a disk rather than an SSD installed, etc, and the process was getting wearisome. And with IT in control of the equipment budget, and users not giving up easily when told they couldn’t have what they wanted (even though it would cost twice what was in the plan), there was no escaping the wrangling.Fortunately, the IT department had been quietly investing behind the scenes in a VDI and digital workspace management environment.It hadn’t taken much working out that most employees were almost completely desk-based; even so-called "mobile" users were actually more "nomadic" in their working patterns - they were usually sitting on a company LAN in one office or another, or on their home Wi-Fi network.


This opened the door to switching many of them to server-hosted virtual desktops, and where this wouldn’t work (for genuine connectivity reasons) you could still centralise and "stream" a lot of what they needed. The workspace management software then allowed most essential resources to be accessed through tablets and smartphones.The pilot had been going well (despite some initial technical glitches and suspicion on the part of users), so our brave IT manager went for it. He got his guys to put together a service catalogue detailing what was available in terms of virtual desktops and application services.Guidelines were then issued highlighting the experience a user could expect given a particular type of device of a particular class. He then transferred the bulk of the desktop uipment budget to business unit managers, which most gleefully accepted – “Free from those killjoys in IT at last!”You can imagine the kind of conversations that took place from there on in.IT Manager: “Well it’s not a Windows machine, so there are some limitations in some areas, and access to some things will depend whether or not they are on the network. But it’s all written down in the guidelines we circulated. It’s basically up to you to decide whether your team can live with the constraints.”



Dept head: “Yeah, I saw that document, but it says the iPad won’t run some of the things we use, and they’ll have trouble directly accessing some of our document shares. So, I think they’ll still have to have laptops as well, and some of those machines are pretty old and need replacing.”Dept head: “But there isn’t enough allocated to give everyone an iPad and upgrade the laptops.”IT Manager: “Then go and talk to the FD make the case to him for more budget.”Apparently, some of these conversations got pretty heated, but they did succeed in getting business managers to start to appreciate the difference between "want" and "need".During the subsequent discussion at our roundtable, we agreed that what our hero had done was a pretty good start, but that the real point of all this was a need to rethink how we tackle the whole end user computing need.Some of the pushback received during the above type of conversations was around why the IT department couldn’t make the same capability available regardless of whether the user chose a Windows machine, Mac, iPad, iPhone, android device or whatever.While the obvious response to this is that they are all different, and run different flavours of software, if we consider the question from a business perspective, particularly if we look forward over the next five to 10 years, it’s pretty clear that we need to drive towards making IT systems in general as device-agnostic as possible.


In practical terms, this essentially means that end user computing is rapidly becoming less about devices per se (which will come and go over time), and more about the infrastructure that enables the application services delivered to them. Obvious when you say it, perhaps, but the truth is that the infrastructure options we ideally need are still a big work in progress from an industry perspective.Mobile application frameworks and middleware are becoming more enterprise ready, and digital workspace solutions are now getting pretty good at presenting services and resources coherently to users across a range of devices. But if vendors are honest, they’ll own up to some aspects of the technology still being a work in progress.The possible exception is VDI, which has matured quite nicely over the last couple of years. Today you can get a hyperconverged platform from pretty much any mainstream vendor, or cartridge-based system (such as Hewlett Packard Enterprise Moonshot), that comes out of the box designed for virtual desktop serving. It’s no longer the black magic art it used to be.



Specific technology to one side, though, the main takeaway from all of this is that things need to change. Right now, too many organisations have one thread of activity around Windows desktops, and another totally different thread around mobile devices and applications. Meanwhile, they just muddle through on things like Macs and possibly Linux machines as best they can. Then to cap it all, the IT team is too often left in the untenable position of having to referee on the conflicting wants and needs of users within the business.Against this background, separating device decisions and budgets from those relating to the infrastructure and back-end systems may be something for more IT teams to aim for. It might not be the answer for everyone, and you certainly wouldn’t want to go down that route before you get your act together on some infrastructure basics, but users are constantly pushing for device freedom, so it’s something to consider as you transform the way things work in your environment.If you have tried any of this yourself, or have other ideas on how best to deal with the increasing complex problem of delivering services into a heterogeneous device estate, we’d love to hear from you.


Message déposé le 22.06.2017 à 12:37 - Commentaires (0)


Battery for Apple A1495

Besides, there’s little chance of Siri being able to hear me over the noisy racket of my MacBook’s fans going apeshit crazy so as to prevent my keycaps from melting. This must be what it feels like for Ontarian hipsters teleworking from a cafe at Niagara Falls, except with less humidity and better tea.Honestly, if the fans blew any harder, my MacBook could technically be classified as a drone.If only I could do something about its 2kg payload, I could hire my aluminium Apple drone out to run errands, delivering lightweight goods such as paperbacks and condoms. I could even get it to spy on my dickhead neighbour who has spent the last 12 years of weekends in his back garden noisily assembling a gigantic rotting wooden shed that looks like Santa’s chalet shitehouse.So, great. I’ve updated my laptop to an operating system that guzzles a full battery charge in less than half an hour. To my horror, I discovered that it does this even when asleep. Perhaps Sierra gives it nightmares.This not a good thing for a computer supposedly designed to be used away from a mains power source. Need. Solution. Now.I checked the user forms at Apple and elsewhere, but found only the same old suggestions that never work such as zapping SMC and NVRAM.


Oh for the love of gaaahd. Who are these helpful souls who go around the forums insisting that every Mac issue ever encountered can be solved by restarting the computer with your fingers held down on keys at opposite ends of the keyboard like a double-jointed cellist? You may as well hold another finger in the wind and thrust one up your arse for all the good it’ll do.Indeed, on my forum visits, offers of solutions were far outweighed by posts by people like me, asking why their MacBooks have suddenly begun blowing sheets of paper off their desks. Some of them didn’t even know that laptops had fans until now, and boy do they know now.Another suggestion is that the updated OS is indexing itself, as if my MacBook was constructed by Heath Robinson and that the indexing process isn’t done in software at all but by fans, and probably a host of cogs, string and spoons holding eggs.Look, if it hasn’t finished indexing my 14 photographs by now after a week, it never will. Time to take the solution into my own hands.A quick peek into Activity Monitor and there it is: the culprit is my old friend, the Safari web browser.Safari is apparently chomping its way through “99%” of my CPU resources. Er, and open web pages are eating up another “105%”... each.Something tells me that either Safari is a jolly demanding mistress or Activity Monitor doesn’t quite understand the concept of percentages.I close a web tab. The fans become quieter. I close all my web tabs. The fans are quieter still. I quit Safari. The fan noise fades away to silence.



Uh-oh, later in the day, the fans are back with a whoosh! What’s up, Activity Monitor? I see, this time it’s iTunes, which launched automatically when I began recharging my phone, and is now taking up “103%” of the CPU. Within seconds of me quitting iTunes, the fans die away again.So I’ve discovered the fix all by myself: under macOS Sierra, make sure you don’t launch any Apple software and you’ll be fine. Bang, solved.Last month’s Mr Chow ransomware attacks serve as a timely reminder that security should be at the top of any business IT strategy. Ransomware is on the increase, at least according to the FBI and while it is not all email borne, it is an example of how sophisticated hackers and criminals are getting with technology.Certainly the recent spear phishing attack at sports anti-doping agency WADA was a clear indication of the lengths attackers will go to creating detailed and personal emails to hoodwink targets. Clearly, email is still one of the biggest threats to business security and will continue to be so for a very long time.In some ways it’s no surprise. Email use is as healthy as ever. According to research company Radicati Group’s Email Statistics Report (PDF) 2015-2019, over 205 billion emails were sent and received every day last year. A six percent increase is expected this year and although numbers vary dramatically from report to report, it seems to average out that around one billion of those emails are spam or malicious emails.In security terms email is of course just the delivery vehicle but it has history. Computer viruses date back to the days of the mainframe and early IBM PCs in the 70s and 80s but it wasn’t until the increased proliferation of email in the late 90s and 2000s that email started to really kick off as a security threat. The Michelangelo virus, Melissa worm and Anna Kournikova virus all became synonymous with computer security threats during the internet boom and dotcom years. Spam email was rocketing too.


In fact, according to Professor Alan Woodward from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Surrey, all that we see on email is exactly what has happened on regular snail mail. The big difference is that it can be done on a massive scale, and you can deliver electronic payloads that once opened are harmful, unlike the normal spam mail you get through the letterbox.“I have to say I think things have become a great deal better. In many ways junk mail filters on corporate mail servers like Exchange are something of an unsung success story,” he says. “Sadly it takes only a few to get through to cause problems but these servers are routinely blocking vast amounts of junk, spam, phishing and malware.”It’s a good point. We often forget about the good work and how quickly security firms react to new threats. Of course, email is not about to disappear from business either. It’s too useful and is a good way of storing a messaging dialogue but as Woodward points out, it’s not the only messaging form that can be open to abuse.“I’ve seen scams only this week using WhatsApp, and phishing using SMS,” he says. “If anything I suspect people who have learned about the dangers of email will end up learning all over again (probably the hard way) that other messaging vehicles can be used to deliver a variety of attacks as well.”


For businesses this is a perennial problem. Threats from email are as old as, well email and keeping pace with any technology change is a constant challenge. Security is however a unique challenge with increased remote working, a variety of devices with an ability to roam networks and an increasingly sophisticated cybercriminal.Prevention, as security firms have been saying for years, is better than cure. Ask US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. She is something of an email security expert now, especially when it comes to understanding the consequences of not taking email security seriously. After being caught using a personal email server for official communications while acting as the US Secretary of State, Clinton has also been hacked, supposedly by the Russians.She is not alone of course. Large businesses and government departments, as well as well-known names, are consistent targets for hackers.Consequently, says Joe Diamond, Director of Cybersecurity Strategy at Proofpoint, “Customers demand more from their security solutions today more than ever before. That’s why we see security in board level conversations. Visibility about who is attacking you, what they are using, who in the organization they are targeting… and even understanding whether your organization is being singled out or caught in the crossfires of a broad attack campaign, are all insights to help organizations respond.”“I think companies can do only more of what they are already doing,” says Woodward. “Use of up to date mail servers, anti-virus and so on is an obvious point. Education is equally important, especially with BYOD muddying the waters. One has to be careful to educate users that not all mail clients are the same.”



Education or lack of it has of course led to human error enabling threats to sneak through cyber defences. Interestingly the number of security breaches reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has doubled this year, up to 2,048 from 1,089 in 2015. Around 70 per cent of these reports were due to human error.“It does suggest that the protection is best done at the server but that is not always possible,” adds Woodward. “Plus if one person is hacked their system can send emails that will appear perfectly valid to any automated system, so the human in the loop has to be on guard. I don’t think any technology is leading the charge but what you are seeing is a more sophisticated scoring system for spam emerging and some of that is being supplemented by heuristics. The systems are learning from what you delete, what is junk.”“Giving away budget never felt so good." Those were the words of an IT manager attending one of our roundtables recently. But why was he so happy about losing control of a chunk of his IT funding?The topic of the roundtable was end user computing, and he was explaining how the annual budget negotiations around desktop equipment were becoming so miserable. For many years, his IT department had defined a range of standard desktop and laptop machines to meet the needs of different types of user, refreshing a subset of kit on an annual basis. It’s a familiar model that many will recognise, and from an IT perspective it’s not a bad way of making sure everything stays manageable.



Message déposé le 21.06.2017 à 07:49 - Commentaires (0)


Battery for Samsung NP-R460

Both M-Series and S-Series have a serious amount of processing power.Capacity can be expanded with E-Series expansion trays or by adding S-Series boxes.There have been hundreds of Swarm software deployments on PowerEdge servers, so Caringo is confident the hardware will do the business. We're told enterprise-class 24x7 on-site hardware support is provided by the Caringo and Dell support organizations working as one team.Swarm 9 is available now. Pricing for the M1000 is $20,000, and the S3000 is $48,000. Both include 3 years of hardware and software support and maintenance.Swarm Servers will be available from Caringo, its global channel, Dell Direct or Dell's channel. That means one more object storage product is available from Dell EMC on top of the EMC products, such as the long-standing Centera, Atmos, and ECS. Let a million object flowers bloom seems to be the idea here, for the time being anyway.


Of all the agile practices out there, “pair programming” is the one that elicits the most heckles, confusion, and head-scratching. The idea is that rather than having one person sitting at a screen, coding, you have two who program together. Those who practice it speak of it like most people do of their first time at Burning Man, while those who have never had the “experience” just can’t see what the big deal is.While finding them are hard, over the years studies of pair programming have consistently shown that it’s an effective way to keep bugs out, write code faster, manage the risk of developer churn, and actually raise morale.But – really? Looking at surveys, I’d estimate that somewhere south of 20 per cent of people do pair programming. If pair programming was so great, why do people find it so odious? I mean, who wants to work so close to someone that you can smell the effects of coding?And as if it wasn’t enough to keep that foetidly in the developer cubes, it’s been wafting into the server room despite those cyclopean fans in there: operators are starting to pair as well.The theory behind pair programming is straightforward: programming is difficult and error prone. It’s much better to have a buddy helping along. In addition to actually coding together, it sometimes means having one developer write code and the other write tests right next to each other, in co-ordination. With two heads together, the thinking is that you write less bugs and get better test coverage.



Indeed pairs in studies over the past 20+ years have consistently written higher quality code and written it faster than solo coders. So, while it feels like there’s a “halving” of developers by pairing them up, as one of the original pair programming studies put it: “The defect removal savings should more than offset the development cost increase.”If the pairs rotate frequently, the theory says you’ll get better diffusion of knowledge across the team: no one person builds up a fief of knowledge around, say, builds, or how the “Print Invoice” function works. This means there’s a lower “bus factor,” helping protect against team churn and brain-drain.Large organisations I talk with - who’re all trying to figure out the footwork for that “digital transformation” dance - use rotating pairing as a way to spread new technical knowledge, but also change that oh so mysterious “culture” in their organisation.Much like alcohol and black coffee, pairing tastes awful at first... until you start imbibing of it repeatedly. In most of the studies, and the feedback I hear from organisations doing it nowadays, pairing practitioners end up liking it after just a few weeks. At first, true, the usually solitary programmer has to, you know, talk to someone else. They even have to get used to be corrected by someone else – horrors of all horrors!


But, with a rigorous enough schedule that allows for breaks and bounds the programming time to normal 9-to-5 schedules, most people end up liking pairing after a while. It only takes a few pints to dedicate your life to it.It’s hard to say why people like it more, but I suspect it has something to do with the fact that humans, fundamentally, like being social, so long as it feels safe. Also, most programmers and operations people take pride in their craft: they want to do good work (despite what those overflowing tickets queues are doing to them). If pair programming increased quality, there’s more to be proud of.Managers of these programmers should also like the quality, speed, and predictability of pairing.That predictability comes from an interesting side effect of how exhausting pair programming is. For one, it’s harder to goof off – er, “check email” – and attend meetings when you’re pair programming. As the man from downtown said: “Always Be Coding.”And, on that kind of schedule, developers are straight up pudding-headed after seven or eight hours of pair programming. As one practitioner put it: “This makes pair programming intense, especially at the beginning. At the end of the first day, I couldn't go home. Before I could face humans again, I put my phone on airplane mode, ignored my usual online accounts, and went to the gym for two hours of self-imposed isolation.”Developers can only pair so long. They have to stop, so you just close up shop at 5. No more playing Doom until 10pm and then coding – er, I mean “working late".



It can come off as sounding a bit like nanny-management, but pair programming seems to induce developers to actually do the work.While the research is sparse (and, really, when it’s “n=whatever students enrolled in my CS class” it’s a little fishy), from where I sit and what people keep telling me, pair programming works. Should you be doing it all the time, though?I’ve heard practitioners say that you should at least do it for complex, difficult tasks. If it’s some routine coding or operations tasks, then pairing may not be the nitro-charge you’re expecting. Indeed, one of the studies suggests that pairing is the most beneficial for “challenging programming problems".Put another way, if the task is “boring,” maybe it’s better to solo it. Still, I can’t help but think that it’ll be the boring tasks that end up biting you, especially when it comes to pair sysadmining. After all, how many systems have come down because of the boredom of DNS configurations? "Open is always going to win," states Ed Hemphill, CEO of WigWag, a company that hopes to make sense of the ever-expanding and ever-more-complex Internet of Things market.WigWag is named after the traditional flags used by the US military's Signal Corps to communicate messages. Hemphill and his cofounder Travis McCollum both served in the Signal Corps before starting up their company in Austin, Texas.


Message déposé le 20.06.2017 à 07:11 - Commentaires (0)


Battery for Acer Aspire 5820T

You may not need HP Workspace at all to make use of the Elite x3, it runs some UWP surprisingly well. It’s just that many applications are missing in UWA format – as we found when we tried to use Continuum for real work.HP has built a comprehensive hardware and software package around the promise of Windows 10 – including a laptop dock (basically a shell of a laptop with a 12.5 inch HD display – pdf), and a desk dock. Orders can be placed with HP for the phone but Microsoft has yet to fulfil its side of the bargain, as Continuum remains resolutely single window for now.Comment Red Hat is the biggest – and one of the oldest – companies in the Linux world, but despite the difficulty of accurately measuring Linux usage figures, Ubuntu and its relatives seem to be the most popular Linux distributions. Red Hat isn’t sitting idle, though. Despite its focus on enterprise software, including virtualisation, storage and Java tools, it’s still aggressively developing its family of distros: RHEL, CentOS and Fedora.Fedora is the freebie community-supported version, with a short six-month release cycle, but it’s still important. Although RHEL is the flagship, it’s built from components developed and tested in Fedora. According to Fedora Project Lead Matthew Miller told this year’s Flock to Fedora conference this summer its future looks bright.After the major "Fedora.next" re-focus in early 2014, Fedora's numbers are up. Both new downloads and updates to installed systems are rising. External involvement – that is, from non-Red Hat staffers – is sharply up: two-thirds of Fedora's contributors are from outside the company these days. And yes, that's counting 'Hatters using non-company email addresses.


It's getting better as a distro, too, benefitting from the improving fit-and-finish of Linux and its manifold supporting components: desktops, applications and their less-obvious underpinnings. Fedora 24 is significantly more usable than it was five or six releases ago. Rather than just being the testbed for future RHEL releases, the project now has wider aspirations – Miller identified the project's primary target as developers.I must confess, I lean more towards Ubuntu, only periodically dipping a toe into the waters of the RPM world. So when looking at Fedora, it’s sometimes irresistible to draw comparisons with the more orangey-purple side of the fence.And these days it's a family rather than a single distro. The old structure of Fedora Core plus additional rings of functionality has been discarded in favour of multiple "flavours", "spins" and "labs"."Flavours" are akin to Ubuntu's editions: as well as the standard GNOME 3 desktop, there's Fedora Server plus the ultra-minimal Fedora Cloud. Fedora's "spins" resemble Ubuntu's remixes, offering KDE, Xfce, LXDE, Maté-Compiz and Cinnamon. An interesting addition is SOAS, a live USB drive with the One Laptop Per Child's Sugar environment.Fedora's Labs are a more versatile equivalent to Ubuntu's handful of special-purpose editions. Labs are pre-assembled bundles of functionally related software, which can be installed as standalone distros or added into existing installations. Finally, COPRs are directly analogous to Ubuntu's PPAs: ad-hoc supplementary repositories to facilitate adding new software that isn't part of the main distro.The overall structure of the software is changing, too. Platform Architect Langdon White’s talk at the conference introduced the Modularity initiative, an attempt to restructure the entire project down into functional modules which can be installed and updated independently, in different ways – for instance as classic RPM packages or container images.Atomic Workstation represents another possible future direction – a smartphone-like OS, with a read-only root partition, installed and updated via OSTree, with all applications in Docker containers.



As of the version 25, standard Fedora will support the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. Fedora is an all-FOSS distro, with no proprietary drivers, firmware or plugins, so it doesn't support the Pi 3's Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, as these require binary blobs. (We're told there are efforts underway to help people install closed-source components, such as Chrome, by the way.)There are still downsides to Fedora relative to Ubuntu. There are no long-term support releases, as that's the role of the technologically much more conservative CentOS. Ubuntu's more pragmatic attitude to including proprietary binaries means more hardware works out of the box, and installing the "restricted extras" package enables Flash, MP3 and so on in one easy operation. But the Red Hat family has come a long way. The 7mm 2.5-inch drives are for standard laptop drive bays, while the 15mm ones are for desktops. We're led to believe that these thicker, higher-capacity 2.5‑inch drives will feature in upcoming external storage products.Seagate says all disk drives in the BarraCuda family have Multi-Tier Caching Technology (MTC) to speed data reads and writes. This uses a hierarchy of NAND Flash, DRAM and media cache technologies to optimise the data flow.


Apparently the drives have new firmware that checks how data accesses are operating and spins the platters down when it can, to reduce power consumption without affecting performance. This might seem of not that much consequence to consumers and small businesses, but it matters more to larger businesses with bigger electricity bills.The 2.5‑inch BarraCudas spin at 5,400rpm, have a 6Gbit/s SATA interface, transfer data at up to 140MB/sec and come with a 2‑year limited warranty. Get a PDF data sheet here. The 7mm thick 2.5‑inch drive has two platters, and the 15mm model has five 1TB platters.The 3.5-inch BarraCudas and BarraCuda Pros are faster, spinning at 7,200rpm, and have a longer, 5‑year warranty. Seagate claims the BarraCuda Pro is the fastest 10TB desktop drive available.The 500GB – 4TB BarraCudas have 1, 2 or 3 1TB platters, a 64MB cache and 55TB/year workload rate limit. The highest sustained transfer rate is 210MB/sec (180MB/sec for the 4TB model). Get a PDF data sheet here.BarraCuda Pros have either 6 platters (6TB and 8TB) or 7 (10TB). Their maximum sustained transfer rate from the data sheet [PDF] is 210MB/sec, while the workload rate limit is 300TB/year.The FireCuda 2.5-inch accelerated drives can be viewed as 7mm BarraCudas with added 8GB cache. Their sustained transfer rate is the same as the BarraCuda; 140MB/sec, though. Seagate isn't revealing the spin speed in the data sheet [PDF], but we figure it's 5,400rpm again.


Sticking these FireCudas in a 3.5‑inch case gets you a 7,200rpm spin speed and a 210MB/sec sustained transfer rate.FireCudas have a 5‑year warranty and, like the BarraCudas, use MTC to speed their operation. They are not given a workload rate limit by Seagate.FireCuda drives operate in the performance gap between basic disk drives and SSDs. We can't expect them to get significantly faster, particularly as the per‑GB cost of flash is dropping with 3D TLC NAND. Caringo has updated its Swarm object storage software and will flog the code on appliances based on Dell PowerEdge servers.Deployments of Caringo's object storage is used for applications such as bulk storage, analytics, archiving, backup, cloud storage and content distribution. The software provides NFS, SMB, S3, HDFS and Rest APIs for native object storage access methods to data.Swarm 9 is the latest release of Caringo's software. It has an NFS protocol converter and the OEM hardware platform in addition to its availability in software-only form. The software features:Data is managed through creation to expiration via administrator-defined policies called Lifepoints, which are stored as metadata that automatically manages the number of replicas, erasure-coding scheme, and deletion.



There can be metadata annotations, made without modifying the reference object, and these are searchable through the SCSP API.The company says Swarm Servers are a fully-supported hardware and software system starting at 288TB and scaling linearly in 96TB increments (just add another S-Series server) to hundreds of petabytes of capacity with a pay-as-you-grow pricing scheme.The system includes M-Series Management Servers and S-Series Storage Servers. The M-Series is a 1U, rack-mountable appliance with a Dell PowerEdge R630 inside it. It has a Xeon E5-2695v4 processor with 18 cores, 128GB DDR4 DRAM, 8 x 1TB, 7,200rpm SAS disk drives, 2 x 10GbitE data access ports and a 1GbitE management port. VMware's ESXi is booted off an internal SD module.The management software is Swarm VMware APP, with a vCenter Server Appliance and ESXi 6.0U2. There is a scale-out, stateless NFS protocol converter for high performance and high availability.The 2U, rackmount, S-3000 Storage Servers use a PowerEdge R730xd platform, with CPU, memory and network resources, plus 96TB capacity. The CPU resource is 2 x Xeon E5-2640v4 10 core processors; 20 cores total, plus 128GB DDR4 DRAM and 12 x 8TB, 7,200rpm SAS disk drives. There are 2 ports of 10GbitE (Intel x540) for data access and a 1GbitE management port.


Message déposé le 19.06.2017 à 08:05 - Commentaires (0)


Batterie pour Compaq Presario CQ40

Pour ceux qui ont encore de l’argent à dépenser, Acer fournit un kit sans fil HD en option. Cela permet un flux en 1080p sans fil et sans perte, de sorte que les utilisateurs peuvent projeter du contenu sans le tracas des fils gênants et disgracieux.Le Predator Z850 sera disponible dans le courant du mois d’avril, au prix de 5 999 euros. Ce sera donc un achat où il faudra réfléchir avant de passer à la caisse…Besoin d’un peu de jus pour votre Apple Watch ? Ou peut-être voulez-vous un peu plus de mémoire ? Bientôt, vous pourriez être en mesure d’obtenir ce dont vous avez besoin, simplement en échangeant le bracelet de la montre.L’Apple Watch dispose d’un petit port caché sous le bracelet, qui sert de « port de diagnostic ». Apple a uniquement utilisé ce port pour la vérification des problématiques sur l’appareil, mais il peut également être utilisé pour le transfert de données et même pour charger la montre connectée. Un nouveau brevet indique que les futures versions de l’Apple Watch peuvent en effet utiliser ce port pour ajouter des fonctionnalités supplémentaires.Le brevet intitulé « modular functional band links for wearable devices », découvert par Apple Insider, suggère qu’Apple lui-même pourrait offrir différents « bracelets intelligents » pour l’Apple Watch par le port diagnostic. Ces bracelets pourraient embarquer des batteries supplémentaires, des caractéristiques liées à votre activité physique, tels que des capteurs de pression artérielle, et même des processeurs supplémentaires pour accélérer le dispositif.


Les bracelets intelligents pour les smartwatches pourraient servir à plusieurs fins. Comme indiqué dans le brevet d’Apple, ils pourraient étendre les fonctionnalités d’un dispositif déjà fonctionnel. Cependant, ils pourraient aussi inclure des parties intégrantes de la montre. Par exemple, au lieu d’avoir une batterie à l’intérieur du châssis de la montre, la batterie pourrait être située à l’intérieur du bracelet, permettant au fabricant de rendre le dispositif plus mince. L’une des principales critiques pour les smartwatches est qu’elles sont trop épaisses par rapport à leurs homologues analogiques.Les bracelets intelligents pourraient également vous donner plus de chance de personnaliser votre appareil. Dans le cas de l’Apple Watch, vous pourriez échanger le bracelet pour répondre à vos besoins en fonction de l’utilisation que vous en faites. Si vous allez à une séance d’entraînement, l’idée serait de prendre le bracelet capable de prendre votre pression artérielle, mais pour le reste de la journée, vous pouvez inclure un bracelet avec une batterie supplémentaire pour prolonger l’autonomie de la montre.Tout le monde sait que les écrans flexibles pour les smartphones sont sur le point d’être la prochaine grande caractéristique des futurs flagships. Cependant, ils n’ont toujours pas fait une apparition sur le marché du grand public, en dépit d’avoir fait tourner les têtes en 2011 à divers salons sur la planète. Néanmoins, à cette époque, il n’y avait rien de plus que des rumeurs sur leur lancement, ce qui a été à peine suffisant pour convaincre les consommateurs que la technologie était prête à entrer en production.



Mais en 2016, il y a déjà eu des preuves d’une production de masse. Pourtant, aucun produit n’a encore été poussé au grand public. Mais, selon une récente publication relayée par ETNews, tout cela pourrait changer l’année prochaine.Le dispositif actuellement en test va être une tablette de 7 pouces une fois dépliée, qui va devenir un smartphone de 5 pouces une fois les bords repliés. Si de tels dispositifs ont déjà existé par le passé, mais le résultat était très maladroit. En effet, les utilisateurs avaient deux écrans distincts, qui pouvaient être conjointement pliés pour afficher qu’un seul écran. Dépliée, une bande de métal sépare les deux écrans, offrant une expérience visuelle plutôt désagréable. Parmi les modèles commercialisés, on peut citer la Kyocera Echo ou la Sony Tablet P de Sony.La source indique également qu’un prototype est déjà terminé. Samsung aurait des plans pour produire en masse l’écran pliable à la fin de cette année, et le commercialiser l’année prochaine.Samsung Electronics et Samsung Display, la division responsable de la production et le développement des écrans de Samsung, auraient établi un partenariat avec les entreprises nationales et étrangères pour développer l’appareil.


Même compte tenu de l’incertitude qui entoure les informations fournies par une source anonyme, il y a encore des raisons de croire que ces écrans peuvent être commercialisés l’année prochaine. Le plus évident de tous est que Samsung a davantage investi dans des installations de production d’écrans OLED flexibles. Et, LG a exprimé son désir de lancer ses propres écrans flexibles sur le marché en 2017. Nul doute que Samsung ne veut pas subir la concurrence.L’industrie de la technologie mobile est arrivée à un seuil où les fabricants optent pour des résolutions 1080p. À ce jour, seule une sélection limitée de smartphones disposent d’un écran Quad HD, et encore moins ciblent le 4K. Alors que l’industrie du smartphone connaît quelques ralentissements dans les ventes, on peut supposer que les écrans pliables offriront aux consommateurs une raison suffisante pour aller de l’avant et faire des achats.Avec une épaisseur de 6,9 mm, vous seriez pardonné de penser qu’Apple est allé aussi loin que possible dans le fait d’amincir son flagship, l’iPhone 6, mais apparemment non selon les dernières rumeurs entourant son futur smartphone phare, l’iPhone 7.Apple a même légèrement augmenté l’épaisseur du châssis avec son iPhone 6S, passant celle-ci à une très respectable épaisseur de 7,1 mm. Mais, des sources de l’industrie évoquant le sujet à ETNews, et relayées par Apple Insider affirment que le rétrécissement du châssis de l’iPhone 7 est l’une des principales priorités de l’entreprise.



Néanmoins, bien que cela puisse être bénéfique, la principale crainte en ce qui concerne l’amincissement de l’épaisseur d’un smartphone est la capacité de la batterie qui s’en voit diminuée. Mais, toujours selon ces mêmes sources, l’iPhone 7 va embarquer une batterie d’une meilleure capacité.Comment est-ce possible vous dîtes-vous ? Le raisonnement fourni est l’utilisation d’une nouvelle technologie « fan out packaging », qui permet de réduire la taille et l’espace qu’occupent les composants. ETNews prétend qu’aucun autre fabricant de smartphones n’a utilisé cette technologie jusqu’ici. C’est très bien, mais pourquoi ne pas garder l’épaisseur actuelle, qui est plus que raisonnable, et augmenter davantage l’autonomie d’un iPhone qui souffre de quelques lacunes sur ce secteur ?ETNews précise également que le développement va même améliorer la force du signal, en rendant certaines puces plus puissantes et efficaces.


Message déposé le 16.06.2017 à 09:35 - Commentaires (0)


Battery for DELL Alienware M17x

But whereas Motorola's Atrix was a fling-it-against-the-wall-and-see caper from a company in turmoil, HP has put quite a lot of wood behind this arrow. It’s narrowcasting it at the businesses where it's appropriate, rather than splurging, though.
The selling point is not cost of hardware – the full kit is a quid short of a grand. It partly comes from convenience, with less material to lug about:
But mainly from back-office savings. From dispensing with the BOFHs. There's a lower TCO, HP reckons, from a phone that's a VDI hub, as it doesn't require an employer to hire so many highly trained IT staff and manage them, Daniel Barham, Mobility Business Development Manager for HP, told us.
It's not going to replace every device, but within multiple verticals it's going to be a strong proposition. Such as? Healthcare, it can enable nurses and doctors to access patient records. Field services sectors, such as engineers; logistics for packing and shipping and inventory tracking. And public sector: law enforcement and blue light (first responders) staff.Not everyone will need or be sold HP Workspace, the VDI service, said Barham. HP Workspace was for SMBs and lower mid-market businesses, in practice meaning companies with 20 to 200 staff. That's because larger enterprises have generally got their own VDI setup established, such as Citrix or VMWare.


HP argues that Windows 10's desperate app gap doesn't really matter so much in the enterprise. Most important apps are covered.There's a range of subscription models, but if you require the Win32 apps and don't have your own VDI setup, the most attractive route is striking a long-term deal with HP Financial Services. If you do, then magically, the headline price plummets. The headline price tag for a HP Workspace offering getting you 40 hours of Win32 app time a month is £603 per year. But that falls to £19 per user per month for 40 hours (the 80-hour tier is £679 a year, which falls to £25 per month per user via HPFS).The x3 deal will be sold through traditional IT reseller channels primarily, although some system integrators are working with HP.A 21 year-old Dutch man has been jailed for one month with another year suspended for infecting more than 2,000 computers to spy on minors via webcams.The man known as Jair M was arrested in October 2013 after he infected the machines with remote access trojans and recorded and captured footage of minors in compromising positions.Court documents reveal he identified vulnerabilities in target computers using the infamous Black Shades remote access trojan (RAT), along with DarkEye, Dark Comet, Cammy, and Cyber ​​Gate.Prosecutors revealed M, who suffers a form of autism, had built phishing sites since the age of 11 and was expelled from high school at 15 for hacking a teacher's computer.


In 2013 the hacker published online a variant of the Dutch national secondary school exam taken by about one fifth of the student population before it was available. Worse still, he posted the exam using another student's laptop.His deception led to the student spending a night in jail and remaining a suspect for months.At the end of April my home was broken into by a professional who silently and systematically looted my residence of all my portable wealth while I slept.In the morning, as I looked around for a phone to call the cops (there wasn’t one, so I had to Skype them from a desktop machine), I saw he’d used an entrance that offered just enough space to enable someone bold and flexible to gain entry.After the police had come, dusted for fingerprints (we found his gloveprints everywhere, but no fingerprints), filled out their reports, and left me to deal with the intricate process of rebooting the credentials of my existence, I had a good think about how I’d overlooked the obvious.A few months earlier the cops had rung my bell and told me my neighbour had been robbed. If I was wise, they advised, I’d keep my place locked up tight.I took their advice, when I was away from home. That was my big mistake, because I refused to believe that I could sleep through a robbery. Until it happened.



For the first few nights after the robbery, I slept uneasily. But fairly quickly I fell into a nightly pattern of walking the perimeter of my home, checking and securing each of the windows and doors before I retired to bed. Rob me once, shame on you. Rob me twice...?Which brings me to last night when friends invited me over for dinner and to revel in their new ultra-high-speed broadband connection. By fits and starts, Australia’s National Broadband Network has finally made it to their residence, and they signed up the day it became available. A hundred megabits of downstream goodness - enough, even, for a few Netflix 4K streams.When I arrived all was in chaos, as one of my friends - who had been a sysadmin in an earlier career - worked to reconfigure the router installed by the ISP. The router had booted with default username and password settings – the same default username and password settings used for every other connection in their apartment buildings. We could see all their remarkably similar SSIDs beaming through the walls of their flat.“Wow, my friend said, “I wonder if any of those folks changed their default username and passwords. Or if they even know they need to.


It’s not hard to be a paranoid in a world that seems to be insecure by design. It isn’t terribly difficult to load up factory firmware that generates a random password, assigns it to a device, then prints a label with that information to go into the box with the gadget. It’s more work than just slapping a default username and password into the software - but not much. And the cost, amortised against tens of thousands of units, can’t be more than a penny or two.Or we can rely on users - who expect, in the era of Apple, that things will ‘just work’ with minimal intervention. Where ‘it just works’ means ‘opens your network to attack’, that’s a sure sign we’ve missed the point, that we’ve grown too lazy, that it’s been too long since the last time we woke up to find ourselves robbed by a thief in the night.Every device - every desktop and laptop and smartphone and connected widget of any sort - must be secure enough against attack that we never need worry that we’re doing enough if we do nothing at all.Is that hard? Maybe. Making devices that are secure by design requires more forethought than we currently allow in product development. That’s the first thing we need to change.


Message déposé le 15.06.2017 à 08:15 - Commentaires (0)


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